Fast Exponentiation, revisited

November 12, 2019

Quite a while ago, I presented a fast exponentiation algorithm that uses the binary decomposition of the exponent n to perform O(\log_2 n) products to compute x^n.

While discussing this algorithm in class, a student asked a very interesting question: what’s special about base 2? Couldn’t we use another base? Well, yes, yes we can.

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Mœud deux

August 7, 2018

Pairing functions are fun. Last week, we had a look at the Cantor/Hopcroft and Ullman function, and this week, we’ll have a look at the Rosenberg-Strong function—and we’ll modify it a bit.

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Mœud

July 31, 2018

Pairing functions are used to reversibly map a pair of number onto a single number—think of a number-theoretical version of std::pair. Cantor was the first (or so I think) to propose one such function. His goal wasn’t data compression but to show that there are as many rationals as natural numbers.

Cantor’s function associates pairs (i,j) with a single number:

…but that’s not the only way of doing this. A much more fun—and spatially coherent—is the boustrophedonic pairing function.

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The Well-Tempered Palette (Part 2)

July 17, 2018

Last week, we’ve had a look at how to distribute maximally different colors on the RGB cube. But I also remarked that we could use some other color space, say HSV. How do we distribute colors uniformly in HSV space?

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Paeth’s Method (Square Roots, Part VII)

March 13, 2018

In Graphics Gems [1], Paeth proposes a fast (but quite approximate) method for the rapid computation of hypotenuse,

\displaystyle h=\sqrt{x^2+y^2}.

The goal here is to get rid of the big bad \sqrt{} because it is deemed “too expensive”—I wonder if that’s still actually true. First, he transforms the above equation:

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Random Points on a Sphere (Generating Random Sequences III, Revisited)

February 27, 2018

While searching for old notes—that I haven’t found anyway—I returned to an old blog entry and I thought I was kind of unsatisfactory, with be best part being swept under the carpet with a bit a faery dust, and very handwavingly.

So let’s work-out how to uniformly distribute points on a sphere in a more satisfactory fashion.

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Square roots (Part VI)

February 20, 2018

I’ve discussed algorithms for computing square roots a couple of times already, and then some. While sorting notes, I’ve came across something interesting: Archytas’ method for computing square roots.

Archytas’ method is basically the old Babylonian method, where you first set

a=1,

b=n,

and iterate

\displaystyle a'=\frac{a+b}{2},

\displaystyle b'=\frac{n}{a'}=\frac{2n}{a+b},

until desired precision is achieved (or the scribe is exhausted).

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