YoU CanT MaKE BuBBleSorT FaSTER With ASseMbLY

14/01/2020

In one of the classes I teach, we end up writing assembly language programs. And while I explain the (sometimes very relative) benefits of writing assembly language, I use bubble sort as an example where even carefully crafted assembly language doesn’t mean much: it’s a bad algorithm to start with.

YoU CanT MaKE BuBBleSorT FaSTER With ASseMbLY

Except that it’s not quite true.

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Reinventing the Wheel (or not)

05/12/2017

About a week ago, some dude drops on IRC that he’s beat memcpy “by a lot”. That’d be interesting, except that we couldn’t get neither code nor test methodology out of him. But, how hard can making a better memcpy be? Turns out, harder than you think!

If you think this is a typical case of “reinventing the wheel”, I mostly agree with you. But while reinventing will be hard, can improvements be made?

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Of tails.

25/11/2014

In a previous post, I explored the effect of pruning on a recursive function, namely, the Collatz function. Richard (see comment) asked “does your compiler know about tail recursion?”. Well, I didn’t know for sure. Let’s find out.

tail-recursion-small

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Yet More __builtins

21/01/2014

So last week we saw how to use some of GCC’s built-ins, this week, let’s have a look at how we can create our own, if need be. Say because you need to have access to some instruction and that GCC does not offer the corresponding built-in.

coin-reverse-small

To do so, we’ll use a bit of the C preprocessor and GCC’s inline assembly extension.

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Faster Collatz

01/05/2012

Quite a while ago, I presented the Collatz conjecture and I was then interested in the graphical representation of the problem—and not really going anywhere with it.

In this entry, let us have a look at the implementation of the Collatz function.

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Faster than Bresenham’s Algorithm?

28/07/2009

There’s always a number of graphics primitives you will be using in all kinds of projects. If you’re lucky, you’re working on a “real” platform that comes with a large number of graphics libraries that offer abstractions to the graphics primitives of the OS and, ultimately, to its hardware. However, it’s always good to know what’s involved in a particular graphics primitives and how to recode it yourself should you be in need to do so, either because you do not have a library to help you, or because it would contaminate your project badly to include a library only to draw, say, a line, within an image buffer.

math06-detail

Lines are something we do a lot. Perfectly horizontal or vertical lines have very simple algorithms. Arbitrary lines are a bit more complicated, that is, to get just right. This week, let us take a look at a few algorithms to draw lines. First, we’ll discuss a naïve algorithm using floating point. We’ll also have a look at Bresenham’s algorithm that uses only integer arithmetic. Finally, we’ll show that we can do better than Bresenham if we used fixed point arithmetic.

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