Is Python Slow? (Part II)

June 8, 2010

In a previous post I expressed my worries about Python being excruciatingly slow and I used a toy problem to compare the speed of Python to programs in other several languages, including C.

Of course, all kind of people complained that I couldn’t compare a dynamic, interpreted language with static, compiled languages. First, let met tell you that I sure can. First, the goal was to measure speed, and not the effects of type system of the language (although logically correlated) nor the programming paradigm: the amount of CPU used to solve a given problem was the primary (if not only) point in interest.

But to be fair to Python, I extended the tests to other interpreted, dynamic languages, such as Lua, Perl, PHP and JavaScript. I also added Pascal and Haskell in the compiled languages groups.

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Your Automatisms Betray You

March 11, 2009

Yesterday someone dropped on the IRC channel where my fellow programmers, computer enthusiasts, and I hang out to get help to find a bug. He uses one of the paste sites (like pastebin.ca, pastebin.com, or rafb.net), pastes his piece of offending code, and so we get a look at the code. Of course, I go over the short program, notice a mistake in the scanf but it took me a full two minutes to notice the loop:

for (c=0; c++; cwe don’t read what’s actually written, but what we think is written, unless we pay the utmost attention to the code—what we should be doing anyway, but do not always. Usually, you zero in on that kind of bug rapidly, as you guide your search from the bug’s symptoms which leads you to defect’s approximate location. If you’re like me—write a little, test a lot—you find those bugs right away most of the times. However, even if you zero in rapidly, you still get a coarse-grained location: module, class, function.

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