Yes? No? Maybe? (Part I)

March 20, 2018

Initializing arrays, or any variable for that matter, is always kind of a problem. Most of the times, you can get away with a default value, typically zero in C#C++, but not always. For floats, for example, NaN makes much more sense. Indeed, it’s initialized to not a number: it clearly states that it is initialized, consciously, to not a value. That’s neat. What about integers? Clearly, there’s no way to encode a NaI (not an integer), maybe std::numeric_limits::min(), which is still better than zero. What about bools?

Bool is trickier. In C++, bool is either false or true, and weak typing makes everything not zero true. However, if you assign 3 to a bool, it will be “normalized” to true, that is, exactly 1. Therefore, and not that surprisingly, you can’t have true, false, and maybe. Well, let’s fix that.

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INT_MAX is a terrible NaN (Safer Integer Types, Part IV)

March 15, 2011

I came across a lovely bug lately. Integer arithmetic, especially in C and C++ it seems, is error-prone. In addition to the risk of having the wrong expressions altogether (a logic error, one could say), integer arithmetic is subject to a number of pitfalls, some I have already discussed here, here, and here. This week, I discuss yet another occasion for error using integer arithmetic.

Consider this piece of code, one that you have seen many times probably, at least as a variation on the theme:

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