Finding dependencies for Make

April 25, 2017

How hard is it to get dependencies for your project to use in a Makefile?

Well, it depends.

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LaTeXify C/C++ code snippets

January 26, 2016

So I’m still writing lecture notes. This time, I need to include kind of larger pieces of C or C++ code, and \LaTeX environments do not really help me a lot. Some are better than others, but you still have to escape and fancify text yourself. This is laborious and error-prone, and is an obvious target for automation. A script of some sort. The task isn’t overly complicated: highlight keywords, and escape symbols like { } _ and & that make \LaTeX unhappy. This looks like a job for
sed.

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Search all your Bibtex files

January 12, 2016

When I write papers or other things, I tend to create separate bib files, so that I don’t end with a giant unsearchable and unmaintainable blob. Moreover, topics tend to be transient, and the bibliography may or mayn’t be interesting in a few year’s time, so, if unused, it can safely sleep in a directory with the paper it’s attached to.

book_stack

But once in a while, I need one of those old references, and since they’re scatted just about everywhere… it may take a while to find them back. Unless you have a script. Scripts are nice.

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Checking a LaTeX Index

March 31, 2015

This week again, LaTeX. This time, the index. At the end of a document, you will usually find an index so that, if you don’t have a magical ctrl-f, you can find something fast in the book.

maths-discretes-index

In LaTeX, creating an index is really easy. You include the package makeindex, and plant \index{topic!subtopic} tags in the text (preferably just besides the word you want to index, the \index command doesn’t understand paragraphs). You add \printindex somewhere else in your document and you run pdflatex (or just latex) to get the index generated. That’s all fine except that it doesn’t provide checks. It adds to the index whatever you typed, and doesn’t give warnings if you have an entry “compression” and an entry “compresion” (because, you know, typos happen). Let’s see how we can somewhat fix that.

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Parsing GPS data with Bash

May 7, 2013

Last time we looked at how to get the data to the GPS and now we will have a look at how to parse the data. Turns out that except for the check-sum, everything is pretty straight forward, even in Bash.

map-detail

So, why bash in the first place? Well, there’s not real reason except that for the something else I’m working on, it’s the ideal glue-code language, allowing me to invoke simply other programs that I do not want to re-code (or take parts of) to do what I want. I must say that I even have a C# version of the GPS data grabber, but while fancier, it does not bring much more than the Bash version.

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Log Watching

November 3, 2009

Very often, you have to keep an eye on a log, or maybe more than one log, and a couple of other things while a long-term simulation is running. The GNU/Linux distributions offer the program watch that allows the periodical execution of a command in the current interactive shell. While watch is convenient, you still have the problem of displaying the needed information in a terminal geometry aware way. Turns out, there are tools to query the terminal geometry and we can use them to write simple, effective, well displayed scripts.

telescope-small

So let us see how we can make BASH somewhat aware of the terminal it runs in.

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